Pros and Cons of Travelling With the Lightest Electric Wheelchair

For many people, travelling is one of their favorite hobbies. Whether it’s a short weekend trip or an extended vacation to another country, most people can agree that the opportunity to see new sights and experience new things is something everyone should take advantage of while they have the chance.

However, for some disabled individuals, travelling isn’t as simple as it might seem. When you’re in a wheelchair, there are numerous factors that come into play when deciding whether or not you can leave your home for an extended period of time.

When planning your next trip, be sure to consider the weight of your electric wheelchair as it could make a big difference in your ability to travel. In this blog post, we will go over the pros and cons of travelling with the lightest electric wheelchair so you can make an informed decision the next time you book a trip.

Pros

There are quite a few advantages of travelling with the Ultra-Lite Mobility Chair.

Easy to Fold and Unfold

For starters, it is easy to fold and unfold, making it simple to transfer to and from your car. Unlike heavier electric wheelchairs, the Ultra-Lite Dual easily folds and unfolds within seconds, making it ideal for travellers. 

It is fitted with quick-release mechanisms that make folding and unfolding the chair simple and quick. You definitely don't want to have the cab driver waiting for you while you struggle to disassemble a heavy wheelchair and try to load it into the trunk in separate pieces!

Light Weight

If you’re travelling by car or cab, you’ll likely have to transfer your wheelchair from the car to the airport at some point during your travels. This can be tricky if you’re travelling with a heavier electric wheelchair. If you choose a lighter model like the 32-lb Ultra-Lite Dual, it will be easier to lift it and carry it into the car boot. This makes transferring much simpler.

Compact

This lightweight electric wheelchair is also easy to store as it folds into a more compact size than other types of motorized wheelchairs, and it can stand up vertically when folded. This makes it simple to tuck your electric wheelchair away in a closet or corner of your small hotel room when it’s not in use.

Lightest electric wheelchair - stands when folded

Removable lithium batteries which comply with airline regulations

Most airlines require you to remove the lithium batteries from your electric wheelchair and put them in your hand-carried baggage before travelling. The Ultra-Lite Dual has snap-on batteries that are easily detached and are small enough to fit into a handbag.

Detachable lithium batteries

Cons

Not suitable for rough terrain

Unfortunately, not everything about travelling with a lightweight electric wheelchair is positive. One of the biggest drawbacks of travelling with this type of wheelchair is that it might not be suitable for rough terrain. They generally lack the power of heavier power wheelchairs, and have little or no suspension systems to absorb the shock of driving over uneven surfaces.

If you plan on hiking or travelling to an off-the-beaten-path area, you’ll likely want to select a heavier wheelchair. But if you're visiting mainly wheelchair-accessible urban areas and indoor places such as malls, then lightweight electric wheelchairs are fine.

Difficult to use on subway trains

One of the biggest problems of subway travel is the gap between the train and the platform. If the gap is too wide, the front wheels of the electric wheelchair tend to fall in, causing the chair to get stuck. If the train is elevated relative to the platform, the Ultra-Lite may not have the power to overcome the curb.


Final Words

If you’re looking to travel and are considering going with an electric wheelchair, there are a few things to consider first. Lightweight models are often the best option for travellers because they are easy to fold and store, simple to lift, and usually lighter than other models. But if you're expecting to visit places which are less wheelchair friendly, then heavier power wheelchairs may be the only option.


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